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Dino Tracks & Rock Art

Peek into the past at one (or several) of Moab’s dinosaur tracks and rock art sites. Learn more about these wonders of history – and how you can help preserve them.

Paleontologists have found a treasure trove of dinosaur remains in the rock formations of the Moab area. The record of dinosaurs and other ancient animals in the Moab area is one of the best in the country. Tracks of dinosaurs of Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous age occur all around the area, in addition to many tracks of many non-dinosaurs.

  • Don’t touch, in any way, the rock art or surfaces around it. The oils in your skin may cause damage to rock art. Don’t apply any substance to the rock art surface, including water or any other fluids. Don’t trace images with sticks, stones, chalk, or other substances.

  • Don’t attempt to remove graffiti, chalking, lichen, bird droppings, or anything else from rock art.

  • Don’t touch, in any way, the rock art or surfaces around it. The oils in your skin may cause damage to rock art. Don’t apply any substance to the rock art surface, including water or any other fluids. Don’t trace images with sticks, stones, chalk, or other substances.

  • Don’t attempt to remove graffiti, chalking, lichen, bird droppings, or anything else from rock art.

  • Don’t collect or disturb artifacts or features at a rock art site. It is acceptable to pick up surface artifacts, examine and enjoy them, or make sketches or take photos of them, as long as they’re returned to the place where found, and no damage is done to the artifact.

  • Don’t remove soil to expose subsurface rock art or archeology.

  • Minimize the number of vehicles going to a site. Stay on existing roads and trails. Do not “pioneer” vehicle trails or parking areas. By disturbing rocks, vegetation, or biological soil crusts you may cause unknowing damage to fragile archaeological sites.” Don’t camp or build fires within 1/4 mile of a rock art site, even if the landowner or public land manager permits camping.

  • Don’t allow children, pets, or inattentive people to behave carelessly around rock art sites. Kicking up dust or dislodging rocks can cause damage to the site.

  • Graffiti, which has become a serious problem across public lands, is not only socially unacceptable but is illegal.

  • Please remember that many living people consider these sites sacred.

Speak out when needed to prevent damage to rock art. Report new rock art destruction, charcoal near the site, or site vandalism to the Archaeological Resources Protection Act hot-line @ 1-800-227-7286.

Site Visiting Etiquette

Respect the Rocks

While it’s tempting to get up-close and personal with Moab’s dinosaur tracks, rock art, and other historical wonders, doing so can cause irreversible damage to sites that can never be replicated.